2012


COMMUNITY PROJECT:                                                     COLONY ARCHAEOLOGICAL INVESTIGATIONS
                                                                                                         Lead: Dept of Archaeology,
                                                                                                                     Aberdeen University


ACTIVITIES AND RESULTS

Two weekends of shovel-pitting across four areas of the Colonists’ fields and dwelling areas resulted in the gathering of dating evidence and an overview of the material culture of the Colonists.
The finds distributions demonstrated differential manuring strategies, presumably related to varying land uses in the sampled areas. A further two weekends of site clearance and recording at Hillside produced further evidence for dating and the material assemblage of the Colonists along with a range of architectural details concerning the construction and plan of this farmstead. This is providing a clearer but also, at times, an unexpected view of the lives of the Colonists. This is now able to set this site within a national context in the story of the ecological development of Britain in the 19th century. Were it not for community help, this work would never have been carried out. Much work will now be involved in the processing, recording and analysis of the finds before the present work can be written-up and published. (See below: POST-EXCAVATION PROCESSING AND ANALYSIS).

 

 
ACTIVITIES AND RESULTS

A workshop was organised to look at the material remains found during the Colony investigations. Volunteers washed some of the pottery and were shown the approach to recording and cataloguing it. This work will be continued over the winter months by the group formed from participants in these workshops who wished to further develop these skills.

 

 

Bennachie and the Garioch
This paper was commissioned by the Bailies in order to assess the viability of undertaking the 'Bennachie Landscapes' project. It is the opening salvo in the 'Social Landscapes' project. The paper can be downloaded as a pdf (click here).